Past news and events

2013 | 2012 |2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005

2013

Vaccines in Public Health Workshop - held on 21 & 22 August 2013

The course was held as an elective within the Master of Public Health and Master of International Public Health programs at The University of Sydney. The course is available yearly to any health professional interested in vaccines and public health. Prior training or experience in epidemiology and/or biostatistics is recommended but not essential.

The course included interactive lectures and small group case studies on epidemiology, program implementation, Indigenous health, adverse events and public controversies presented by some of Australia’s leading researchers in immunisation.


National Immunisation Program Implementation Seminar - held on 7 & 8 March 2013

This one and a half day seminar brought together a range of key stakeholders involved in the development, management, delivery and evaluation of immunisation programs in Australia. Content included discussion around key implementation challenges and potential solutions with an aim to identifying priorities to enhance future immunisation program implementation in Australia.

The program featured invited speaker, Nikki Turner, from the New Zealand Immunisation Advisory Centre. Also featured were representatives from each state/territory immunisation program, Medicare Locals, immunisation providers including general practitioners and nurses, Aboriginal Community Controlled and remote health sectors.

Click here for a PDF version of the Immunisation Program Implementation Seminar booklet

Click here to view Presentations and panel discussions from the 2 day seminar.


2012

Vaccines in Public Health Workshop - held on 14 & 15 August 2012

The Vaccines in Public health Workshop is an elective offered yearly within the Master of Public Health and Master of International Public Health programs at The University of Sydney. It is available to any health professional interested in vaccines and public health. This year's two day workshop proved to be very successful and was attended by approximately fifty students.


Ethical Issues In Immunisation Seminar

The Ethical Issues in Immunisation Seminar was held on March 26th, The Darlington Centre, The University of Sydney

This one day seminar addressed the major ethical issues facing immunisation programs in Australia today -

* What level of vaccine risk is acceptable and who should decide?
* Is it unethical not to have a no-fault compensation scheme for
serious adverse events attributed to vaccination?
* How far can we go in getting people to be vaccinated?
* Is the current system for funding vaccines sufficient?
* How can vaccine programs incorporate public values?

Speakers included Marie Bismark, Stacy Carter, Andrea Forde, Claire Hooker, David Isaacs, Heath Kelly, Ian Kerridge, Julie Leask, Kristine Macartney, Roger Magnusson, Helen Marshall, Peter Massey, Terry Nolan, Glenn Salkeld, Cameron Stewart.

Copies of presentations given on the day are available via the links below - Please note files are large and may take a couple of minutes to download.

No-fault compensation for vaccine related injuries - the NZ experience - by Marie Bismark
How far can government go in promoting vaccination? - by Robert Hall
No fault compensation for adverse events attributed to vaccination - by Heath Kelly
A little bit more ethics on power and persuasion in immunisation - by Ian Kerridge
What is an acceptable risk and who decides? - by Roger Magnusson
Funding population immunisation in Australia - by Terry Nolan
An economic perspective on the selection and reimbursement of vaccines in Australia - by Glenn Salkeld
Legal arguments in favour of a vaccination compensation scheme - by Cameron Stewart


Click here for a PDF version of the Ethical Issues in Immunisation Seminar program


2011

Vaccines in Public Health Workshop

Two day workshop at The Children's Hospital at Westmead
31 August & 1 September 2011

The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS) conducts a workshop on Vaccines in Public Health every year. The workshop is offered as one of the elective subjects in the Master of Public Health (MPH) and Master of International Public Health (MIPH) program at the University of Sydney. It is also open to those not currently enrolled in a MPH/MIPH program who are interested in vaccines and public health.

Progress toward control of Meningococcal Disease Workshop

15 November 2011, Melbourne

This scientific workshop will bring together both national and international experts to share the latest information in biology, epidemiology, prevention and complications of meningococcal disease.


National Pertussis Workshop hosted by NCIRS - 25 & 26 August 2011, Darling Harbour, Sydney

The National Pertussis workshop brought together both national and international experts to share the latest information on pertussis. Topics included epidemiology, vaccine efficacy, vaccine schedules, new strategies and future steps and priorities on pertussis.

Click here for a PDF version of the National Pertussis Workshop program/abstract booklet

Copies of presentations can be accessed via the presentation title links below - Please note files are large and may take a couple of minutes to download.

Day 1 - 25/8/2011

Is Australia the world capital of pertussis? - by Peter McIntyre
Pertussis control - has Canada got it right? - by Scott Halperin
Risk factors for death from pertussis (California)? - by Kath Harriman
Severity of pertussis in hospitalised children - by Helen Marshall
What do we know about source of infant infection? - by Kristine Macartney
Pertussis strains - do they matter? - by Ruiting Lan
Vaccine efficacy and surrogate markers - by Peter McIntyre
Vaccine effectiveness & duration of immunity - US overview - by Tom Clark
Vaccine effectiveness & duration of immunity - Australia - by Helen Quinn
What do we know about impact of vaccines on transmission? - by Patricia Campbell
Pertussis vaccine schedules - what can serosurveillance and modelling tell us - by Jodie McVernon

Day 2 - 26/8/2011

Experience with cocoon implementation and impact -
California - by Kath Harriman
US overview - by Tom Clark
Australia - by Stephen Lambert
Maternal immunisation - can we do it, what can we expect? - by Scott Halperin
Neonatal immunisation - can we do it, what can we expect? - by Nick Wood
Live attenuated pertussis vaccines - are they the future of pertussis control? - by Camille Locht


2010

Public Health Association Australia (PHAA) 12th National Immunisation Conference - 17th - 18th August 2010, Adelaide, South Australia

The Public Health Association of Australia Inc (PHAA) provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, knowledge and information on public health. The Association is also involved in advocacy for public health policy, development, research and training. Over 30 NCIRS staff members attended the conference and participated in presentations or poster displays. It was a successful event and well over 500 people from around the country from various health and medical backgrounds attended.
Invited speakers:

Progress reports – Pertussis 2010. – Professor Peter McIntyre
Rotavirus vaccines in Australia: An update. – Dr Kristine Macartney
Influenza vaccines: new and old. – Professor Robert Booy

Other presentations:

Rotavirus

Rotavirus vaccine coverage and the impact of the vaccine on the timeliness of other NIP vaccines recommended at the same age - Brynley Hull

Pertussis

Decennial administration of a reduced-antigen-content dTpa vaccine (Boostrix) in adults - Professor Robert Booy
Long term immunity of birth and one month old acellular pertussis (PA) vaccine - Dr Nick Wood
Impact of the national adolescent dTPa immunisation program - Dr Helen Quinn
Impact of removal of the 18 month DTPa dose on pertussis vaccine effectiveness - Dr Helen Quinn
Protecting infants from pertussis by immunising parents – a literature review - Kerrie Wiley

Varicella/Herpes Zoster

The impact of varicella vaccination three years into a publicly funded program Dr Anita Heywood

Congenital and neonatal varicella: impact of National Varicella Vaccination Program in Australia - Dr Gulam Khandaker
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Health
Human papillomavirus vaccine: how effective is the uptake in Indigenous Australian females? - Telphia Joseph

Service Delivery

Implementation of a state-wide policy directive for mandatory immunisation of healthcare workers - Dr Julie Leask
Awareness and attitudes toward adult pertussis vaccination recommendations in parents and carers of four and five year old children - Kerrie Wiley

Pneumococcal Disease

Implementation of the national childhood pneumococcal immunisation program: stakeholder perspectives - Dr Aditi Dey

Viral Diseases

Hospitalisation rates of seasonal influenza in non-Indigenous and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children - Dr Clayton Chiu
The impact of hepatitis A vaccination of Indigenous Australian children - Dr Rob Menzies
Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice
The adolescent’s experience of school-based HPV vaccination - Dr Spring Cooper
Caregivers’ intentions regarding seasonal influenza and H1N1 vaccines for their children - Maria Chow
Parents of children attending childcare – beliefs about seasonal and H1N1 influenza - Catherine King

Adverse Events

Ten year clinic experience of adverse events following immunisation at The Children’s Hospital, at Westmead - Dr Nick Wood
Trends in surveillance of adverse events following immunisation in Australia 2000–2009 - Dr Deepika Mahajan

Bacterial Diseases

Immunogenicity and safety of the combined Hib-MenC-TT vaccine in Hib-primed/MenC-unprimed toddlers - Professor Robert Booy
Hib disease in Indigenous Australian children, 1993–2008 - Dr Rob Menzies


2009

Preventing Cervical Cancer: Integrating Screening and Vaccination

The Victorian Cytology Service Inc (VCS), in association with the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases (NCIRS), is proud to be the organiser of Preventing Cervical Cancer 2009: Integrating screening and vaccination (PCC2009)

PCC2009 will brought together international and Australian experts in cervical screening, vaccination and cancer epidemiology to debate and explore current and future directions in the prevention of cervical cancer. It provided a forum for these experts to share their vision and influence policy development in the prevention of cervical cancer.

Australia’s cervical screening program is amongst the most successful in the world. Now, coupled with our world-leading commitment to population-based vaccination for high-risk HPV, Australia is poised to develop highly effective new models for cervical cancer prevention that could eventually lead to the almost total eradication of this disease.

National meeting on pneumococcal disease (July 2009)

Selected presentations now available below:

Second Indigenous Immunisation Research Workshop (July 2009)

Selected presentations now available below:

2007

SEMINAR: Developing and communicating about immunisation policy - the bit we don't talk about (September 2007)

This seminar was given by Professor David M Salisbury CB FRCP FRCPCH FFPH, Director of Immunisation, Department of Health, United Kingdom.

Summary
The development of immunisation policy in the UK is similar to the model of other industrialised countries: an independent expert advisory committee reviews evidence that it receives, makes recommendations to the Government and these are applied throughout the UK. Where there are differences are in the arrangements for management of the programme.

A team of around 20 individuals within the Department of Health manages the strategy development and implementation. Their work spans the bringing together of scientific evidence, the purchase, supply and distribution arrangements for vaccines, the informatics systems for the immunisation programme and the communications work that informs and supports immunisation implementation.

The UK programme uses the usual process and outcome measurements that are routine (coverage and disease surveillance) but also monitors public knowledge and attitudes about immunisation with equal priority. Given the extent of investment especially in new vaccines, it is of increasing importance that consumer attitudes are monitored and reflected in programme management. This aspect of programme management requires skills specific to the task and that should be integral within national programmes.

View a copy of Professor Salisbury's presentation - Developing and communicating about immunisation policy - PDF

Communicable Diseases Control Conference (March 2007)

NCIRS staff presented a number of posters at the recent CDC conference in Canberra. The biennial national conference is held under the auspices of the Communicable Diseases Network Australia and the Public Health Laboratory Network. PDF copies of the posters can be accessed below.

Ralf Itzwerth

Pandemic Influenza: Sydney Business Leaders discuss the possible Impact in a Focus Group - Ralf Itzwerth


James Wood

An earlier 2nd dose of MMR? Insights from modelling - James Wood


Helen Quinn

Pertussis epidemiology in Australia over the decade 1995-2005: trends by region and age group - Helen Quinn


Anita Heywood

Age-specific trends in varicella hospitalisations in Australia prior to a universally funded program - Anita Heywood


IX International Symposium on Respiratory Viral Infections (March 2007)

NCIRS staff presented a number of posters at this recent conference in Hong Kong. PDF copies of the posters can be accessed below.

Clayton Chiu

Active surveillance and early intervention with oseltamivir for controlling influenza outbreaks in aged care facilities - Clayton Chiu


Holly Seale

An Outbreak of Influenza B at a Chronic Care Psychogeriatric Hospital - Holly Seale


Australian Government Funds Rotavirus vaccine (28 March 2007)

Two Rotavirus vaccines will be included on the National Immunisation Program, Rotarix® from GlaxoSmithKline and RotaTeq® from CSL Limited.

The new vaccine will be given orally to babies from two to six months of age, commencing in July 2007. All babies born from 1 May 2007 will be eligible for the free vaccine. Two or three doses, depending on the brand administered, will generally be given at the same time as other immunisations at around two, four and six months of age. more...

TGA statement on Gardasil adverse events (6 December 2007)

The Theraputic Goods Administration released a summary of reported adverse events following the distribution of over 2.2 million doses of the human papillomavirus vaccine in Australia. This statement is available at the Department of Health and Ageing Therapeutic Goods Administration website.

2006

NCIRS Varicella Zoster Virus Workshop (November 2006)

A 2-day workshop on the varicella zoster virus was held in Sydney on the 16-17th November 2006. Prominent international guest speakers included Professor Myron Levin (US), Professor Anne Gershon (US) and Professor Judith Breuer (UK).

Vaccine Preventable Diseases and Vaccination Coverage in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People, Australia, 2003 to 2006.

This is the second NCIRS publication focussing on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It includes the latest detailed data on 9 major vaccine preventable diseases, as well as vaccination coverage in children and adults. This publication is now available at the Communicable Diseases Intelligence website.

2005

Breakthrough in TB vaccine?

Increased vaccine efficacy against tuberculosis of recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin mutants that secrete listeriolysin

Release of Vaccine Preventable Diseases and Vaccination Coverage in Australia, 2003 to 2005 publication

NCIRS is proud to announce the publication of Vaccine Preventable Diseases and Vaccination Coverage in Australia, 2003 to 2005, which is the fourth national report into Australia’s progress in preventing diseases through vaccination.

The report provides an overview of the 16 diseases preventable by currently available vaccines. These include the 12 for which vaccines were funded nationally for children by the end of 2005 (diphtheria, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) disease, hepatitis B, invasive pneumococcal disease, measles, meningococcal C disease, mumps, pertussis, poliomyelitis, rubella, tetanus and varicella), and another 3 vaccines only funded or recommended for specific high-risk groups (hepatitis A, influenza and Q fever). Rotavirus, for which new vaccines became available in 2006, is also included.

The report can be found at the Communicable Diseases Intelligence website.